Updates from August, 2012 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Brigit Law 5:46 pm on August 3, 2012 Permalink | Reply  

    Leadership: In three or four steps? 

    As an Storyteller & Leadership enthausiast, I like to work with script writing structures in my communication work, in particular the three-step approach: Beginning , Middle, and End.  

    As an Equestrian & Leadership enthausiast, however, I have recently started to work with the four-step approach: Request, Pressure, Response, and Reward.

    Why?

    (More …)

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    • Ashkuff 3:44 pm on August 8, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      I totally feel people’s complaints that the gov’t “did not inform well enough.” During the 2004 Atlantic Hurricane Season, my disabled grandmother wasn’t able to evacuate very well, so my mother and I trailed behind with her.

      A State Representative I spoke with in 2011 scoffed at our behavior, and told me that the Red Cross could’ve outfitted my grandmother with a free wheelchair.

      Although that’s a pretty cool rescource, we weren’t informed about it until seven years after we needed it. Lolz.

      — Ashkuff | http://www.ashkuff.com | Bored with reading about others’ adventures? Burning to venture out yourself? Let this applied anthropologist remind you how.

    • Brigit Law 6:18 pm on August 11, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Unfortunately, crisis management is something people don’t want to communicate about until it is (too) late. A compulsary download of a Red Cross App would be no luxery in today’s world.

  • Brigit Law 5:48 pm on June 19, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , EquiCoaching, , Stap 1-2-3   

    Step 1-2-3 

    A Dutch friend of mine started her own business in EquiCoaching called ‘Step 1-2-3’. 

    This sounds like a great name to me. It reminds me of the three part-view of a story, a journey, a program or a project: The Beginning, The Middle and The End. A creative adventure to lead change …

    (More …)

     
    • Ruth Tearle 6:26 am on June 21, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Bridget, I like your fresh idea of using a “beginning, middle and end story” with change management.

      It resonates with the whole Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey – which is in the following blog.

      http://www.changedesigns.net/_blog/Change_Designs_Blog/post/Creating_heroes_The_story_behind_cultural_change_management/

      • Brigit Law 5:27 pm on June 27, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Ruth, Thanks for your reference to Joseph Campbell’s hero story. He is right when he says: “When we ask our employees to ‘change’ we are asking them to forsake the world they know, and to commit to going on a journey…” A journey that does not bring people back to the home they know as most people on a holiday do, but to a new and fresher home based on new personal achievements and insights as real travellers (story hero’s) do. A new home that may be situated in the same old brick walls.

  • Brigit Law 11:54 pm on February 29, 2012 Permalink | Reply  

    Trot, And You’ll Lead! 

    It’s not new when I say that horse riding contains many metaphors for good, creative leadership. You may know many yourselves.

    I started horse riding four years ago at the same time I started my own business. I am not a very demanding and egocentric by nature and – therefore- not natural leader. I neither feel the urge to proof something to my friends or family – a proven help in successful leadership -, so I was well advised by a Swedish friend to take up horse riding to get the hang of good leadership.

    And it pays off, in particular because of my wonderful American instructor Judie.

    Here are a couple of equestrian principles she thought me which I like to share with you as food for thought in business leadership:

    1. Post Bigger when trotting, not smaller. In English riding one is tempted to post smaller in an effort to stop a horse going t0o fast, but the opposite is true. When you want a horse (or organization) to go more slowly and in controlled manner, start posting bigger.

    2. Don’t Focus, just Be Aware. Whilst many management gurus and alpha-male leaders advocate that ‘Focus’ is the key to success in business, equestrian leadership will tell you that ‘Being Aware’ is a better key to good leadership. Putting a strong focus on something particular means that one does not see or sense other important signals (in an organization).

    3. Use Your Space. Horse riding is a mirror to how we cut short our corners if we are not conscious of all the free space around us. Cutting corners short means more difficult turns and more stress. In communications & leadership this is also explained by (not) using ‘white space’ in writing or by getting active in the ‘complexity quadrant’ of Dave Snowden’s  Cynefin. There is much to say for showing leadership where the situation complex, though much less crowded.

    These are my favorite thoughts that help me to keep my leadership skills in form. What are yours?

     
  • Brigit Law 10:29 pm on January 9, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: coaching, creative leadership, soccer,   

    Storytelling Coach Is Winning Card For Soccer Team 

    If you believe, like me, that leadership is more than top down communication. If you, like me, believe that leadership is more coaching than dictatorship. And if you, like me, believe that established leadership styles are in need of an overhaul, than check out how the coach of my son’s soccer team uses Storytelling and wins the league. Storytelling is the new coaching technique.

    (More …)

     
  • Brigit Law 4:02 pm on July 25, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Training met Storytelling I: Meer dan Verbeelding 

    Voor TheNextTrainer.nl in Nederland blog ik drie weken lang over Storytelling & Training. Aandacht voor het aanspreken en werken met onbewuste denkpatronen van cursisten ligt centraal. Mijn eerste blog van vorige week is hier te lezen.

     
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