Updates from March, 2013 Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Brigit Law 11:18 pm on March 29, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , cultural differences, , horse riding   

    Everytime a different ride 

    My life not only requires me to find my bearings in different countries and places, but also riding different horses at different stables.

    Different horses have different ways of listening and communicating and every time I sit in the saddle fustrated that i cant find the right mode to connect. my hands a little lower? My posture a bit more straigtened up? It reminds me of the difficult moments to figure out a culture and nationality. Exactly what are the do’s and don’t-s? How do I and my children make friends? Can my children just ring at neighbor door bels asking to play like they got used to in the previous countries they lived? At my riding lessons I have at least a riding instructor at hand, but in my day to day American life, I have not.

    What I have found so far is the eminent importance of making expectations match reality. How?
    1 Read books about your host country
    2 Form or join weekly coffee morning or book clubs where you can ask questions
    3 volunteer and/or work in your area of interest to get a learning & giving experience as well as to give structure to your days
    4 Try – and this is the most difficult part – to turn dissapointments into inspiring lessons you want to learn from.
    5 Keep strong and tight family bonds, they will never let you stand alone no matter how much you change. (And change you will!)

    So, if you get into the saddle, be ready for the ride. And whilst you will never be ready as to know what to expect, you should be ready to go!

    Good luck on your different rides & have a great Easter!

    20130329-230152.jpg

     
  • Brigit Law 9:57 pm on August 26, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , observer, relocation, , storyteller   

    Meet Me, Meet The Observer 

    What would you be if you had moved home and country every three years for the last 20 years? When you lived longer abroad than home? You would be like me:  a community Observer.

    (More …)

     
  • Brigit Law 6:12 pm on August 11, 2012 Permalink | Reply  

    What’s Your Slogan? 

    It’s amazing, that feeling when you hit on a slogan that is really you.

    For me, it’s this one of Dr Seuss, that sums up my whole life since I left home at eighteen.

    “From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere!”
    ― Dr. Seuss, One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish

    What slogan says it all for you?’

     
    • themysticmom 5:14 am on August 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Great question! I think I have several. One of my favorites came in an anniversary card from my in- laws: “Everywhere you go becomes a part of you somehow.”. This is so soothing for those of us who like to grow “deep roots,” but are all too often uprooted and transplanted again! 🙂

  • Brigit Law 5:46 pm on August 3, 2012 Permalink | Reply  

    Leadership: In three or four steps? 

    As an Storyteller & Leadership enthausiast, I like to work with script writing structures in my communication work, in particular the three-step approach: Beginning , Middle, and End.  

    As an Equestrian & Leadership enthausiast, however, I have recently started to work with the four-step approach: Request, Pressure, Response, and Reward.

    Why?

    (More …)

     
    • Ashkuff 3:44 pm on August 8, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      I totally feel people’s complaints that the gov’t “did not inform well enough.” During the 2004 Atlantic Hurricane Season, my disabled grandmother wasn’t able to evacuate very well, so my mother and I trailed behind with her.

      A State Representative I spoke with in 2011 scoffed at our behavior, and told me that the Red Cross could’ve outfitted my grandmother with a free wheelchair.

      Although that’s a pretty cool rescource, we weren’t informed about it until seven years after we needed it. Lolz.

      — Ashkuff | http://www.ashkuff.com | Bored with reading about others’ adventures? Burning to venture out yourself? Let this applied anthropologist remind you how.

    • Brigit Law 6:18 pm on August 11, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Unfortunately, crisis management is something people don’t want to communicate about until it is (too) late. A compulsary download of a Red Cross App would be no luxery in today’s world.

  • Brigit Law 5:49 pm on July 12, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Change Management, , , Julia Roberts, , Mona Lisa,   

    Change comes … naturally. 

    Just like the equestrian world is talking about natural horsemanship, the managerial world should start talking (more) about natural change management.

    I just watched the film Mona Lisa smile on TV, a film set in 1953 with Julia Roberts as the art teacher Ms Watson who tries to inspire conservative young women in the 1950s to reach beyond their role as housewife, go to university and become leaders in society. Ms Watson, who used art to help her students to think out of the box, was desperate to make a change, but almost failed because of driving it too hard.

    I did not know the film, nor that it would be on TV tonight. So, it felt a real treat that I bumped onto this great movie among the tons of stuff I don’t like on TV.

    The beauty of this film comes at the end. The film follows the great classic storytelling technique with a clear moral and message for society where people (women) can relate to for years to come. People’s ‘wanting’ was trying to overshadow people’s ‘being’ and the ‘conscious & controlled behavior’ tried to win from the ‘subconscious & natural behavior’.

    Fortunately, the latter won. As the film says at the end:

    Don’t try to hard too make a change. Just be true to yourself and change will come …, naturally.

     
  • Brigit Law 5:48 pm on June 19, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , EquiCoaching, , Stap 1-2-3   

    Step 1-2-3 

    A Dutch friend of mine started her own business in EquiCoaching called ‘Step 1-2-3’. 

    This sounds like a great name to me. It reminds me of the three part-view of a story, a journey, a program or a project: The Beginning, The Middle and The End. A creative adventure to lead change …

    (More …)

     
    • Ruth Tearle 6:26 am on June 21, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Bridget, I like your fresh idea of using a “beginning, middle and end story” with change management.

      It resonates with the whole Joseph Campbell’s hero’s journey – which is in the following blog.

      http://www.changedesigns.net/_blog/Change_Designs_Blog/post/Creating_heroes_The_story_behind_cultural_change_management/

      • Brigit Law 5:27 pm on June 27, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Ruth, Thanks for your reference to Joseph Campbell’s hero story. He is right when he says: “When we ask our employees to ‘change’ we are asking them to forsake the world they know, and to commit to going on a journey…” A journey that does not bring people back to the home they know as most people on a holiday do, but to a new and fresher home based on new personal achievements and insights as real travellers (story hero’s) do. A new home that may be situated in the same old brick walls.

  • Brigit Law 11:20 pm on May 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , leiderschap, neurologie, sportmanship   

    New Leadership is a Sense that stimulates the Mind 

    I guess no one can write, talk or think about leadeship without making synergies with sportmanship from time to time. Especially when you live in the USA.

    This evening I read this poem to my eight year old daughter which reminded me of the real status of leadership: that of a human Sense that stimulates our State Of The Mind. A sense that can be developed just like a sense for sportmanship. Just listen to this pro’s advice…

    PRO’S ADVICE
    If you want to play tennis, I’ll give you a tip:
    You must practice your stroke,
    You must tighten your grip,
    You must straighten your shoulders
    And swivel your hip
    And develop your sense of sportmanship.
    (Poem by Shel Silverstein in Every Thing On It)

    It is the status of the mind. Like sportmanship, leadership is not the end or the beginning of something. It is the State of the Mind that steers our behavior to getting something done.

     
  • Brigit Law 3:16 pm on March 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Gender Balance, , Muna Abu Sluyman   

    Balancing Out The Corporate World With Quotas 

    Last week a post from the Economic World Form showed up on my Facebook with Muna Abu Sluyman from Saudi Arabia sharing her ideas about gender and equality at the work floor.

    In her blog ‘Balancing Out The Corporate World’ she explains why mandatory quotas are needed to ensure that women join the decision makers in this world. I couldn’t agree more with her.

    Indeed, quotas are a crucial step to female empowerment in business with the end goal to achieve a better balance in decision making and, hence, finding solutions to the needs of a community or society at different levels of emotion. The latter – the goal – is often forgotten in the debate about this instrument, what a quota merely is. That is why we all, men and women, need to force ourselves to look beyond the instrument and understand better the goal we want to reach. This important worldwide debate should not be belittled or slowed down by some of the less flattering details of the instrument.

    In many instances, quotas are not very popular and stir up a lot of emotions. You only have to look as far as the Dairy and Fishing industry to see how quotas give people the creeps. But is that a reason not to use them?

    Don’t get me wrong, working with quotas is not a concept that I favor in principal and like to think we don’t need them. Regularly, my husband – a decision maker in industry – and I have tough discussions about it. On the other hand, why is it so difficult to accept that quotas help? Many woman – and I am one of them – just need that extra push get a sound and respectful female leadership community to look up to. Why? Because there is an urgent need for people and profiles we as women can more easily:

    • identify with,
    • admire, and
    • get inspired by.

    The key emotional ingredients for moving up and forwards in business, wouldn’t you say?

    I know, quotas feel like putting an elephant in a china shop. However, it is not unusual in business to put an elephant in a china shop in order to get things moving and shaking and more importantly, to get people to change their believes that are hidden far back in their mind and steer their unconscious behavior. So, quotas could be the hammer on a fragile nail that refuses to go in. Now, the challenge is to use the hammer in a subtle way.

    Back to the challenge of inspiration and perception. When I searched for images to go with this article I noticed how difficult it is to find images that portray the essence of this subject . If you Google on let’s say ‘Board Woman’, you get girls in bikini. Online magazines like Spiegel Online lack imagination with an awful image of a lake and mountains when covering the Norway Case in their article ‘Norway’s Experience Shows Compulsory Quotas Work’

    And another very sad image of a woman alone in a meeting room was shown alongside the article Norway’s New Quota: Corporate Board 40% Women Or Else!

    And what do you think about this awful image alongside another article from Spiegel Online ‘Gender Equality’.  The Dominatrix looks like a nicer person to work with than this woman …!

    And perhaps wort of all are magazines and blogs that do not even have an image with their articles on gender equality, such as Ignore the doubters. Norway’s quota on women in the boardroom is working

    Sadly it looks to me that the media wants us to believe that we have a long, muddy and indefinite path to go. Of course, it is nothing like that at all. It are all man who wrote these articles.

    What we need is a tsunami of contemporary images of women in this world doing their leadership job on a daily base. Women like the Principal of my kid’s elementary public school, Scotland Elementary School (PA), who steered the school into the top three ranking of public schools in the area.

    Windows of opportunities are opening for women, but for how long will they stay open? I am sure that this era of social practices and emotions will be followed up by a new one where men will claim their positions in leadership back, whether in a traditional or new format. The changing of the wheel goes fast. Change in business and society lays around the corner, all the time.

    And THAT, my dearest reader, is WHY we need QUOTAS as a mean to enhance Female Leadership.

     
    • gromykl 4:00 pm on May 1, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Couldn’t agree more! 🙂 Just wrote a similar blogpost a little while ago. Found this blog through twitter searching on expat, just started off as a expat spouse myself with a small child and are trying to find my way

    • Mike 1:38 pm on August 17, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Your first error is think that for start much people support female empowerment like something good for our society. Your second error is think that the end justifies the means, and it turns worse when you understand that the last objetive is not shared for most of the people. If you dare to break one of the few principles that is really accepted for most of the people like valid, like is formal equality, to be able to favour women ¿how would you defend yourself if appeared a new social-engineer ideology that conclude that its better for the society, men and women, return to the traditional sketch, and that the state must break the formal equality in order to get that?

      • Brigit Law 4:54 pm on August 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Mike, female empowerment, – or a women’s gateway to equal participation in working life as I prefer to call it – is not something one supports but merely confirms. It is like potty training a toddler: you need to give the toddler a potty to succeed. For woman’s equal participation you need to give her a quota to succeed.

  • Brigit Law 11:57 am on February 15, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Privacy, Rules   

    5 Facebook Rules I Live By 

    I felt some feeling of spring in the air when I left the barn at Wilson College this morning. The sun shone differently, warmer. The horses were in good form and I can look back on a very good riding session. Every time it amazes me how horseback riding get one to experience the flow communication so clearly.

    What I am going to share with you today are my favorite Facebook tips. The five Facebook rules I live by.

    These are the rules I believe are essential to follow. Anything else, any more elaborate advice, flows from here.

    1. Share only what EVERYONE should know and DON’T share what only a few should know
    2. Don’t presume that everyone automatically receives your message. People more often don’t than do listen
    3. Apply the ‘No Man Is An Island’-approach, i.e. pay attention to others, your stakeholders
    4. Write news stories that are desirable, visually digestible and shareable. Messages must slide through digital communities like a piece of hand soap
    5. Respect people’s privacy at all times

    I compiled these yesterday for a private and membership based organization who had questions about what and what not to publish on their Facebook. They are in a phase of change where they are opening up more to the community to attract new members and events to their club. So, a critical look at how to use Facebook in these important times, is important for them.

    I hope you will have a nice day with just that little bit of spring feeling too!

     
    • aviva 12:40 am on February 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      aviva
      Good article and Nice blog greetings! aviva

    • Charles Derbyshire 11:03 am on February 20, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Hello there, just became alert to your blog through Google, and found that it is really informative. I’m going to watch out for brussels. I’ll appreciate if you continue this in future. Lots of people will be benefited from your writing. Cheers!

      • Brigit Law 6:09 pm on February 21, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Charles: Thank you for you very kind and supportive feedback on my blog.

  • Brigit Law 10:12 am on January 18, 2012 Permalink | Reply  

    Originality and Momentum Is Wearing Off at OWS 

    I just read the article:

    Is Occupy Wall Street strapped for cash?

    The Washington Post Social Reader reports that Occupy Wall Street is running out of money, according to the Wall Street Journal. Although I cannot imagine a more unreliable source to trust in the case of how Occupy Wall Street is doing, there may be some truth in it.

    Originality and momentum wears off quickly with whatever one does. In many cases it is also true that the quicker the success comes, the quicker it disappears. Unless one is out for a to set a quick mark, making a change as a steady organization requires long term strategy and vision, a history and above all resilience and good planning of resources.

    Whether OWS will be a ‘stayer’ or just a one day wonder, they stood up when needed and has left an important mark history already. And since the world economic crisis is far from over, it may continue to do so despite set backs. In fact, it are the set backs that establish a real change!

    Read full article here.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel